1
E not available for all women. Furthermore the numbers of women in early menopause were few. These complications of data led us to the crude analysis used in the study. However, our analysis was good enough to show the variability between women, and suggest the need for larger follow-up studies to describe the natural course of menopausal symptoms. To estimate the duration of symptoms among unsele
1
Same. Some women had symptoms variably (i.e. having one or more measurements without symptoms and then again reporting symptoms). Younger women did not systematically have more bothersome symptoms than older women. Comparing the proportions of women with bothersome symptoms at various times to those in the crosssectional analysis of Table 2 reveals relatively similar percentages. For comparison, w
1
Ughly the same level. Table 3 gives the results of the longitudinal analysis in which the same women were followed from one survey to another. There were some differences by the number of follow-ups (how early or late the woman was recruited) as well as by compliance with the surveys (did she skip some of the surveys, group "Intermittent surveys" in Table 3). In the groups with only three or twoTa
1
En 19?4.Our sample size was too small to analyze this in relation to background characteristics to explain the variation. The results of the longitudinal analysis (comparing the same women over time) and those of the cross-sectional analysis showed relatively similar results. Thus, we can interpret the cross-sectional data as generally summing up the experience of all women throughout the followup
1
Ughly the same level. Table 3 gives the results of the longitudinal analysis in which the same women were followed from one survey to another. There were some differences by the number of follow-ups (how early or late the woman was recruited) as well as by compliance with the surveys (did she skip some of the surveys, group "Intermittent surveys" in Table 3). In the groups with only three or twoTa
1
Ps were very similar by the studied background characteristics. Table 2 gives the prevalence of vasomotor symptoms according to a cross-sectional analysis. At the time of recruitment, about two thirds of the women reported vasomotor symptoms, and about a half regarded them as bothersome. In the survey a year later, less (53 ) of women reported vasomotor symptoms and a third found them bothersome.
1
Same. Some women had symptoms variably (i.e. having one or more measurements without symptoms and then again reporting symptoms). Younger women did not systematically have more bothersome symptoms than older women. Comparing the proportions of women with bothersome symptoms at various times to those in the crosssectional analysis of Table 2 reveals relatively similar percentages. For comparison, w
1
Ited by Eaton P. New York: Nova Publishers; 2001. 11. Piliang K: Indonesia arrests 8 in fires causing choking haze. http://www. irrawaddy.org/asia/indonesia-arrests-8-in-fires-causing-choking-haze.html. 12. Schiffman SS: Introduction: health and ecological linkages. Environ Int 2003, 29:351. 13. Gadit AAM: Ecology and mental health: time to understand ecopsychiatry. J Pakistan Med Assoc 2009, 59:5